Social Communications

Pope Francis’ Message on 55th World Communications Day

Dear Brothers and Sisters, The invitation to “come and see”, which was part of those first moving encounters of Jesus with the disciples, is also the method for all authentic human communication. ...
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‘A Chapter A Day’ New Testament Audio Project

An audio podcast produced by St Jude’s Parish, Bunan Gega and launched by Archbishop Simon Poh. Beginning from June 2020 – February 2021 (9 months), a daily audio of ‘a chapter a day’ of the New Testament recorded in Bidayuh Serian, is available from the link below. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbkBE_tvR4vNxpmlRq0zNgw Sebuah projek podcast audio yang dihasilkan oleh Paroki St Jude, Bunan Gega, dan dilancarkan oleh Uskup Agung Simon Poh. Bermula Jun 2020 - Februari 2021 (9 bulan), audio harian 'satu bab sehari' dari Perjanjian Baharu yang dirakamkan dalam bahasa Bidayuh Serian dapat diperolehi dari pautan berikut. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbkBE_tvR4vNxpmlRq0zNgwAn audio podcast produced by St Jude’s Parish, Bunan Gega and launched by Archbishop Simon Poh. Beginning from June 2020 – February 2021 (9 months), a daily audio of ‘a chapter a day’ of the New Testament recorded in Bidayuh Serian, is available from the link below. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbkBE_tvR4vNxpmlRq0zNgw Sebuah projek podcast audio yang ...
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Pope Francis’ Message on 53rd World Communications Day

Message of His Holiness Pope Francis For the 53rd World Communications Day Dear Brothers and Sisters, Ever since the internet first became available, the Church has always sought to promote its use in the service of the encounter between persons, and of solidarity among all. With this Message I would like to invite you once again to reflect on the foundation and importance of our being-in-relation and to rediscover, in the vast array of challenges of the current communications context, the desire of the human person who does not want to be left isolated and alone. The metaphors of the net and community Today's media environment is so pervasive as to be indistinguishable from the sphere of everyday life. The Net is a resource of our time. It is a source of knowledge and relationships that were once unthinkable. However, in terms of the profound transformations technology has brought to bear on the process of production, distribution and use of content, many experts also highlighted the risks that threaten the search for, and sharing of, authentic information on a global scale. If the Internet represents an extraordinary possibility of access to knowledge, it is also true that it has proven to be one of the areas most exposed to disinformation and to the conscious and targeted distortion of facts and interpersonal relationships, which are often used to discredit. We need to recognise how social networks, on the one hand, help us to better connect, rediscover, and assist one another, but on the other, lend themselves to the manipulation of personal data, aimed at obtaining political or economic advantages, without due respect for the person and his or her rights. Statistics show that among young people one in four is involved in episodes of cyberbullying. In this complex scenario, it may be useful to reflect again on the metaphor of the net, which was the basis of the Internet to begin with, to rediscover its positive potential. The image of the net invites us to reflect on the multiplicity of lines and intersections that ensure its stability in the absence of a centre, a hierarchical structure, a form of vertical organisation. The net works because all its elements share responsibility. From an anthropological point of view, the metaphor of the net recalls another meaningful image: the community. A community is that much stronger if it is cohesive and supportive, if it is animated by feelings of trust, and pursues common objectives. The community as a network of solidarity requires mutual listening and dialogue, based on the responsible use of language. Everyone can see how, in the present scenario, social network communities are not automatically synonymous with community. In the best cases, these virtual communities are able to demonstrate cohesion and solidarity, but often they remain simply groups of individuals who recognise one another through common interests or concerns characterised by weak bonds. Moreover, in the social web identity is too often based on opposition to the other, the person outside the group: we define ourselves starting with what divides us rather than with what unites us, giving rise to suspicion and to the venting of every kind of prejudice (ethnic, sexual, religious and other). This tendency encourages groups that exclude diversity, that even in the digital environment nourish unbridled individualism which sometimes ends up fomenting spirals of hatred. In this way, what ought to be a window on the world becomes a showcase for exhibiting personal narcissism. The Net is an opportunity to promote encounter with others, but it can also increase our self-isolation, like a web that can entrap us. Young people are the ones most exposed to the illusion that the social web can completely satisfy them on a relational level. There is the dangerous phenomenon of young people becoming "social hermits" who risk alienating themselves completely from society. This dramatic situation reveals a serious rupture in the relational fabric of society, one we cannot ignore. This multiform and dangerous reality raises various questions of an ethical, social, juridical, political and economic nature, and challenges the Church as well. While governments seek legal ways to regulate the web and to protect the original vision of a free, open and secure network, we all have the possibility and the responsibility to promote its positive use. Clearly, it is not enough to multiply connections in order to increase mutual understanding. How, then, can we find our true communitarian identity, aware of the responsibility we have towards one another in the online network as well? We are members one of another A possible answer can be drawn from a third metaphor: that of the body and the members, which Saint Paul uses to describe the reciprocal relationship among people, based on the organism that unites them. "Therefore, putting away falsehood, speak the truth, each to his neighbour, for we are members one of another" (Eph 4:25). Being members one of another is the profound motivation with which the Apostle invites us to put away falsehood and speak the truth: the duty to guard the truth springs from the need not to belie the mutual relationship of communion. Truth is revealed in communion. Lies, on the other hand, are a selfish refusal to recognise that we are members of one body; they are a refusal to give ourselves to others, thus losing the only way to find ourselves. The metaphor of the body and the members leads us to reflect on our identity, which is based on communion and on "otherness". As Christians, we all recognise ourselves as members of the one body whose head is Christ. This helps us not to see people as potential competitors, but to consider even our enemies as persons. We no longer need an adversary in order to define ourselves, because the all-encompassing gaze we learn from Christ leads us to discover otherness in a new way, as an integral part and condition of relationship and closeness. Such a capacity for understanding and communication among human persons is based on the communion of love among the divine Persons. God is not Solitude, but Communion; he is Love, and therefore communication, because love always communicates; indeed, it communicates itself in order to encounter the other. In order to communicate with us and to communicate himself to us, God adapts himself to our language, establishing a real dialogue with humanity throughout history (cf. Second Vatican Ecumenical Council, Dogmatic Constitution Dei Verbum, 2). By virtue of our being created in the image and likeness of God who is communion and communication-of-Self, we carry forever in our hearts the longing for living in communion, for belonging to a community. "Nothing, in fact, is as specific to our nature as entering into a relationship one with another, having need of one another," says Saint Basil. The present context calls on all of us to invest in relationships, and to affirm the interpersonal nature of our humanity, including in and through the network. All the more so, we Christians are called to manifest that communion which marks our identity as believers. Faith itself, in fact, is a relationship, an encounter; and under the impetus of God's love, we can communicate, welcome and understand the gift of the other and respond to it. Communion in the image of the Trinity is precisely what distinguishes the person from the individual. From faith in God who is Trinity, it follows that in order to be myself I need others. I am truly human, truly personal, only if I relate to others. In fact, the word "person" signifies the human being as a "face", whose face is turned towards the other, who is engaged with others. Our life becomes more human insofar as its nature becomes less individual and more personal; we see this authentic path of becoming more human in one who moves from being an individual who perceives the other as a rival, to a person who recognises others as travelling companions. From a "like" to an "amen" The image of the body and the members reminds us that the use of the social web is complementary to an encounter in the flesh that comes alive through the body, heart, eyes, gaze, breath of the other. If the Net is used as an extension or expectation of such an encounter, then the network concept is not betrayed and remains a resource for communion. If a family uses the Net to be more connected, to then meet at table and look into each other's eyes, then it is a resource. If a Church community coordinates its activity through the network, and then celebrates the Eucharist together, then it is a resource. If the Net becomes an opportunity to share stories and experiences of beauty or suffering that are physically distant from us, in order to pray together and together seek out the good to rediscover what unites us, then it is a resource. We can, in this way, move from diagnosis to treatment: opening the way for dialogue, for encounter, for "smiles" and expressions of tenderness... This is the network we want, a network created not to entrap, but to liberate, to protect a communion of people who are free. The Church herself is a network woven together by Eucharistic communion, where unity is based not on "likes", but on the truth, on the "Amen", by which each one clings to the Body of Christ, and welcomes others. From the Vatican, 24 January 2019, the Memorial of Saint Francis de Sales. Franciscus Message of His Holiness Pope Francis For the 53rd World Communications Day Dear Brothers and Sisters, Ever since the internet first became available, the Church has always sought to promote its use in the service of the encounter between persons, and of solidarity among all. With this Message I would like to invite ...
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Merdeka & Malaysia Day Message 2018

Brothers and Sisters, The theme for this year’s 61st Merdeka Day and 55th Malaysia Day celebration “Sayangi Malaysiaku” resonates most deeply with the beating heart of every Malaysian. It also marks a maturity of sorts for our Nation which had witnessed an unprecedented electoral tsunami and most importantly a peaceful transfer of power that took place on 9 May 2018. We offer praise and thanks to God for blessing our beloved country with renewed hope. However, the work of Nation rebuilding is not only for politicians but also for every citizen. Our role in nation-building Our moral duty did not end at the ballot box. In fact, it was just the beginning. Much work is now needed to put our Nation back on the path of national togetherness, where good governance, fairness and justice must no longer be mere slogans but become facts of everyday life. This is only possible if we as faithful and responsible citizens assume the responsibility of fostering this spirit of unity, trust, fairness and accountability in our own daily lives. We must find our strength of action from our faith where civility and mutual respect are deeply entrenched in scripture, in our prayers and in the example of our Saints. It is upon this bedrock of faith that we must manifest our care for each other irrespective of creed or colour and for the vulnerable, the discriminated and the marginalised in society. Every choice that we make, must take us ever closer and in favour of the common good and preserving Malaysia in all its colour, its worship, its diversity and in its uniqueness. For if we are to regard Malaysia as our shared home, we must learn to appreciate each other and learn from one another. We ought to avoid choices that only serve narrow and personal aims that are ultimately destructive to our spiritually, to our social fabric, race relations and our environment: “For the Lord gives wisdom; from his mouth come knowledge and understanding. He holds success in store for the upright, he is a shield to those whose walk is blameless, for he guards the course of the just and protects the way of his faithful one.” Proverbs 2:6-8 Redefining Nationalism Nationalism isn’t about aligning oneself to the dominant narrative of the day. It is never about tyranny of a majority against a minority. It is never the misappropriation of National resources to the exclusion of others. Perhaps we ought to return to the words of our founding father Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra, in the Proclamation of Independence where he said that our Nation: “shall be for ever a sovereign democratic and independent State founded upon the principles of liberty and justice and ever seeking the welfare and happiness of its people and the maintenance of a just peace among all nations”. It is perhaps timely that we reflect, advocate and act upon these founding principles of Nationhood that in time, may break the narrow and selfish Nationalism indoctrinated upon us in the past. Build Bridges Malaysia’s progress as a Nation must include the cultivation of essential values which are integral to the harmony and unity of its people. This translates to building strong bonds of understanding and unity among the various races and religions. Thus ensuring that fair-play and care for all people form the cornerstone of our society. We are Malaysia. The friendships we build across our social boundaries, across our comfort zones and across racial and religious divides are what makes Malaysia the nation that it is. With God as our loving guide, may our love for our neighbour increase and may we continue to celebrate the diversity of this country – a place we belong to each other. Malaysia needs every one of us to build on the good works of the past. Brick by loving brick we must ensure a just society, a bulwark against any future storm. Let us recapture and retain the innocence of that first muhibbah spirit and the feeling of pride for our Nation – the same togetherness and pride our forefathers felt hearing the proclamation of “Merdeka! Merdeka! Merdeka!” Today, let us as one united Malaysia, proudly declare that we ‘Sayangi Malaysiaku’. SELAMAT MENYAMBUT HARI MERDEKA DAN HARI MALAYSIA! Devotedly in Christ, Most Reverend Julian Leow Beng Kim, D.D, Archbishop of Kuala Lumpur President, Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Malaysia on behalf of the bishops of Malaysia Brothers and Sisters, The theme for this year’s 61st Merdeka Day and 55th Malaysia Day celebration “Sayangi Malaysiaku” resonates most deeply with the beating heart of every Malaysian. It also marks a maturity of sorts for our Nation which had witnessed an unprecedented electoral tsunami and most importantly a peaceful transfer ...
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Chancellory Notice

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Urbi et Orbi: Pope Francis’s Christmas Message and Apostolic Blessing

Pope Francis gives his traditional Christmas message and the Apostolic Blessing "Urbi et Orbi" to the faithful gathered in St. Peter's Square and to those listening to him on radio and television. Come back to watch this on 25 December, 6.30 pm Malaysian time. To listen to it in English: (step by step guide) 1. Go to Radio Vaticana. 2. Look for the Radio player at the right side of the website (as seen below). Change the channel (highlighted in blackbox) to "RV09" in the drop down menu. 3. Click the speaker icon  and enjoy the live broadcast! Pope Francis gives his traditional Christmas message and the Apostolic Blessing "Urbi et Orbi" to the faithful gathered in St. Peter's Square and to those listening to him on radio and television. Come back to watch this on 25 December, 6.30 pm Malaysian time. To listen to it in English: (step by ...
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[Video / News] Consistory for the creation of new cardinals

The Gospel passage we have just heard (cf. Lk 6:27-36) is often referred to as the “Sermon on the Plain”. After choosing the Twelve, Jesus came down with his disciples to a great multitude of people who were waiting to hear him and to be healed. The call of the Apostles is linked to this “setting out”, descending to the plain to encounter the multitudes who, as the Gospel says, were “troubled” (cf. v. 18)....
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[Video] Launching of the 40th Anniversary celebration of the Archdiocese of Kuching

On the last Pentecost, 22 May, the Archdiocese of Kuching launched her year-long celebration of 40th anniversary of the archdiocese. A video with the message from Archbishop John Ha and four people sharing their faith stories (based on the theme "Pentecost: Christ filling the Church with the Power of the Holy Spirit") was shown in all parishes in the archdiocese. View the videos (with three different languages) here....
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